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Employment Records

 

filesWhat records must I keep as an Employer in Ireland?

Irish employment legislation places an obligation on an employer to maintain the following minimum records:

  1. Your employer registration number with the Revenue Commissioners

  2. Name, Address and PPS number for each employee

  3. The terms of employment for each employee

  4. Copies of all payslips

  5. Payroll details .e.g. Allowances, gross to net, overtime, shift allowances, commissions, bonuses, etc.

  6. Employees Job Classifications

  7. Hours of work for each employee. These must be very detailed, and include start and finish times, breaks and rest periods.

  8. Commencement date and where applicable termination date, for each employee.

  9. A register must be maintained of all employees under 18 years of age .

  10. Details of any provision for board and lodgings.

  11. Holiday and Public Holiday entitlements taken by each employee.

  12. Such documents as may arise under employment rights legislation.

An inspector carrying out an inspection on behalf of the National Employment Rights Authority can request to see all of those records.

 

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What steps should I take to ensure compliance with Irish Employment legislation?

Using the check list below, you should carry out a quick review of the records you hold for each employee.

If you have a full record for each employee, in each category, well done.

If you find that there are some records either missing or not maintained, then you should contact us immediately to discuss how to sort out the problem and put you back in compliance with the law.

Don't put off taking action. If you find yourself the subject of a NERA inspection, you will be glad that you acted now.

 

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We understand that most employers are working under extreme time constraints. That is why you should delegate the task to one of our experienced experts.

Contact us today to discuss your Irish Employment law needs, and get the peace of mind that comes from knowing that you are compliant.

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